Association Excellence: Tools for Developing a High-Performing Board

For associations, the board of directors offers crucial support for the organization. Even when the association has a strong leader, skilled and supportive staff, and dedicated members, the board of directors helps further advance the association and plays a key role in its success.

The board of directors helps to shape the association’s vision, ensures there are adequate resources to carry out the work of the organization, and ensures compliance with laws and regulations. But just as board members are expected to contribute to and monitor these important areas, they too need adequate resources to carry out their work.

Much like the employee hiring process, identifying and recruiting the right board members requires a well-planned strategy. The strategy must consider the association’s current and future needs and tactics for finding board members who can help resolve the needs.

So, how do we get a board that is performing well to move a step farther? And, how do we get a poor-performing board to take corrective action?

When we look at what leads to a poor-performing board, research shows four common factors that contribute to the performance:

  • Poor communication
  • Lack of understanding about board member roles and expectations
  • Poor use of board member talents and skills
  • Disconnect between the board of directors and leadership team

Undoubtedly, everyone is committed to the success of the organization. But do the leaders know what is troubling the board? Do they know about board member concerns? Do the board members and leaders see the same vision for the organization? How do we get board members and the leadership communicating and working together cohesively?

For answers to these questions and for tools for developing a high-performing board of directors, iCohere is offering a free webinar training.

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Association Excellence: Tools for Developing a
High-Performing Board

Join us for this webinar featuring organizational change expert and author Rick Maurer.

As an association leader, are you giving your board members the tools they need to successfully support your organization? Running an association is tough and even more challenging when led by a poor-performing board of directors. The right resources can help shape a board into a high-performing board and ensure alignment across the organization, both strategically and operationally.

Here’s what you will learn:

  • How to use The Energy Bar, an interactive, online leadership tool to shift resisters to supporters
  • How to work effectively when board members resist you
  • How to build support for association projects and goals

Plus prevent resistance to change with these webinar takeaway tools:

  • A six question assessment to help plan your case for organizational change or a new project
  • How an LMS, online community, and more can help foster board engagement and build a strong board

About the Host: Throughout his career, Rick Maurer has worked with leaders of Fortune 500 companies, nonprofit organizations, and associations helping them lead Change without Migraines™. Through his programs, he has helped companies such as Lockheed Martin, Deloitte & Touche, and Charles Schwab build strong, collaborative leadership teams. He is the author of several books including the bestselling book Beyond The Wall of Resistance.

Want to watch Rick Maurer’s webinar for developing a high-performing board?  Join the iCohere Academy for free and gain access to this ‘on-demand’ webinar and many others for free.  Join the academy here.

join-icohere-academy

After registration:
Logon to the ‘iCohere Academy’.
Select ‘Courses & Webinars’.
Select ‘Rick Maurer: Developing a High-Performing Board’.
Select “Click to View Archived Recording”.
*You may have to download ‘WebEx’ to view this. Don’t worry, it is fast and free.

 

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