How To Get A Grant To Fund Online Learning

Online learning has become a key alternative to traditional brick-and-mortar training, enabling busy adults to gain critical knowledge anywhere and anytime, without the need for expensive and time-consuming travel or transportation. The average adult faces increasing demands on time and money, with diminished resources in a tight economy. And most of them have a hard time juggling family and work responsibilities, much less enrichment activities like skills training and professional development.

If you serve these people, you are probably looking for ways to reach them, and extend your learning opportunities to them on their terms. That’s where eLearning steps in, as it enables organizations that offer educational programs to reach more people, more quickly, and more efficiently, and at a lower per unit cost than traditional training.

The eLearning industry has grown tremendously in the last decade. Analysts estimate that since 2009, eLearning rose from a $27 billion industry to over $50 billion in 2014. Supporting to the growth are several large scale studies indicating that learning online is a better alternative for adults, and creates superior learning outcomes.

So why isn’t your organization moving to online learning?

If initial cost is a factor, and if you have programs that meet the needs of a deserving segment of society, a grant may be the answer!

How to get a grant to fund online learning

Join Mary Ann Borman, Ph.D., and Valerie Whitcomb, MBA, of iCohere, in a Leadership Learning webinar as they discuss possible sources of funding to establish an online learning program. This one-hour presentation will also include how to use iCohere to manage your grant, and use this dynamic and versatile system to enhance your grant program and report on critical metrics that will establish grant outcomes.

What you will learn from this informative (and free) educational program:

  • The basics of how to put a grant proposal together
  • Instructions on how to approach common requirements including the elusive “verifying outcomes” requirement
  • How to form partnerships and consortiums to get the most from your grant applications
  • How to use the iCohere system to extend your learning programs online in a variety of formats
  • How existing iCohere clients use the platform for grant-funded programs
  • How the iCohere system could be used to manage grant programs and report on outcomes
  • How to prepare programs for online deployment, what is involved and how long it takes

If you are new to grants, you will receive a “grant-readiness” checklist that shows what most funding providers will look for in evaluating an application.  You will also receive a list of federal, state and private funding sources that may be a good fit for online learning programs.

There has never been a better time to seriously consider eLearning for association and member growth.

About the Speakers:

Mary Ann Borman, Ph.D., is the Director and Principal Consultant of Management Development Consultants, a grants development and management organization. She brings a significant track record of proven and successful broad based organizational, program and non-profit management experience, which has resulted in over 136.5 million in successfully funded grants which have made significant impact on the communities they serve.

Valerie Whitcomb, MBA, is a Senior eLearning Analyst at iCohere, and helps clients develop strategies to deliver high-quality, online learning programs in the most economical manner possible. She has experience in most every aspect of online learning including: analysis and program design, learning system configuration and implementation, curriculum development, and course design. She is a qualified instructional systems designer (ISD) and has a solid understanding of curriculum development methodology, and principles of adult learning.  She is an author and speaker on eLearning technologies, and sits on the board of two non-profit organizations.

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